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How to Craft a Garden Scrapbook

Garden scrapbooks can present a natural feeling when the audience is reading your storybook. Flowers are one of the popular natural-based elements that many people cherish. You can store flowers in a scrapbook to craft a garden style creation. To start you will need a dried flower. Compress the flower placing it into your scrapbook pocket, such as the memorabilia. Next, glue, tape, etc, the flower so that it is sticking on the page securely. You may have seen flowers preserved in bibles. The process in scrapbooks is similar, only you want to stick the flowers so that it does not fall out.


How to craft flowers for scrap booking:
You can use corsages, bouquets, or the colored part of the flower to craft your garden scrapbook. The compressed and dried flowers should be in a straight line, added to your scrapbook page, and smoothly seated near your photographs. Discover more about bespoke log cabins at www.ilikelogcabins.com.


Your dry flowers and compressed flowers should be laminated. Use Xyron, or any acid-free product to laminate your flowers.
During the fall is the best time to pluck materials to make up a garden scrapbook. As you make up your garden scrapbook consider title page, captions, journal, lettering, photos, plant species, headings and more.


If you are adding fall leaves to your scrapbook, you may want to visit a copy shop. You will need to place the leaves in a sealed container when transferring the leaves. The leaves with depreciate over time if you fail to follow instructions. You can add the leaves at your title page to start your garden scrapbook.
If you are making up a scrapbook to present your garden, snap a few pictures and make up a blueprint. The blueprint should include each detail of your garden. Following, you can add a journal to let your friends and family know how you invented your garden.


When to take photos:
Spring, summer, winter, and fall is the best time to take photos of your garden. Each season provides you a variety of colors, shades, texture, blooms, etc. Once you snap the shots add them to your garden scrapbook.
If you want to get created you can cut, paste, and add extras to your scrapbook, i.e. cut magazine clips based on your garden theme and add them to your scrapbook. Also, you can add tips beside your pictures to help your family and friend learn.


During the seasons, you want to document your gardens activities as well as your own to create a genealogy, and history of your scrapbook. Record detail specifics to help your audience learn from your efforts. During the summer record, the blooms so that when winter comes you can look back on your success. When the blooms start to grow, you may want to snap photos so that you can add to your scrapbook. Try crafting your scrapbook in a chronological order so that your book tells the story you want to portray to the audience.
Some people add special rocks to their scrapbook. If you decide to add, rocks try to find the small, flat rocks. The thicker, bulk rocks will only interrupt your scrapbook.


Flowers are beautiful inside scrapbooks. The flowers that set off garden scrapbooks include roses of all colors, daffodils, tulips, crocuses, and so on. Still, if you add flowers to your scrapbook you want to use petals that harmonize with your theme. For instance, if you are crafting a summer page, then use colorful flower copies. If you are crafting a fall theme, then use the flowers that flow in harmony with your theme.

Using Vines to Decorate your Garden
A great way to decorate your garden is the use of vines. They are very low maintenance and look good on almost anything. If you’ve got a fence or separator that really stands out in the field of green that is your garden, then growing a vine over it can be a quick and aesthetically pleasing solution. However, there are many types of vines for different situations, whether you are trying to grow it up the side of a house, along the ground, or up a tree.
Many different ground vines are available. These types grow fast and strong, and just inch their ways along the ground. They are very easy to direct, so they can make a border around your garden, or just weave in and out of the plants. I suggest using these as a hardy ground cover if you just want some green on your dirt or mulch. Usually you can find a variety that is resistant to being stepped on. It’s like a leafy, nice alternative to grass. Even if you have kids and a dog, it should have no problems staying alive.


Another type of vine that is available is a “twining” vine. This refers to their method of climbing. Twining vines require a lattice or equally porous surface to climb up, since they are not sticky at all. They just climb by sending out small tendrils to loop around whatever is nearby. I suggest using this type of vine for climbing up trees, or any type of mesh. Usually you have to guide them a lot more during their early stages, and after that they will go wherever you want them to.


Vines not only look good on the ground or on lattices, you can blend them in to the very architecture of your house. This is usually achieved through the use of vines with small tendrils that have adhesive tips. They extend from the vine and attach themselves to almost any surface. If your garden is adjacent to your house and you want something to camouflage the big unsightly wall, it’s a great idea to start out a few vines near the base. If you have a vine like the Virginia Creeper growing, then your entire wall will be covered in a matter of months. However I have seen situations where the vine got out of control. After that, you have no choice but to watch the vine take over your entire house.


One of the vines that you would probably recognize is Ivy. You see it around a lot, generally because it is so adaptable. Out of the types I mentioned above (ground, twining, and sticky pads), Ivy can fill in for pretty much anything. It makes a great ground cover, and will grow up about any surface you put it on. Although it grows quick and strong, I wouldn’t suggest growing it up your house. This is because recently, buildings which have had ivy for many years have found that it has been deteriorating the building.


So no matter what you want to do with a vine, you should have no problem getting it to grow. You should always do your research beforehand and find out about any negative qualities the vine has (such as its ability to destroy buildings, in Ivy’s case.)

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